Living Savior

  • We dedicate so much of our lives trying to fit in and feel like we belong. With each passing year we realize the brokenness of our world and its inability to satisfy the longings of our heart. More and more feeling out of place might actually be a good thing? God's Son unsurprisingly seemed out of place when he came to this earth. Therefore, it shouldn't surprise us when the same is true of those who follow him. All the more we want to discover the beauty of knowing we don’t belong.

  • We dedicate so much of our lives trying to fit in and feel like we belong. With each passing year we realize the brokenness of our world and its inability to satisfy the longings of our heart. More and more feeling out of place might actually be a good thing? God's Son unsurprisingly seemed out of place when he came to this earth. Therefore, it shouldn't surprise us when the same is true of those who follow him. All the more we want to discover the beauty of knowing we don’t belong. This week, we look at where this all started for Jesus public work. In his baptism he takes us with him as he launches onto the scene to live a life that is entirely contrary to this world. As Martin Luther put it, “(in baptism) We do no favors.” We make ourselves and our children enemies of sin, death, and Satan. Yet, how beautiful it is to know that God in baptism has saved us for our eternal home. Even now he helps us live an un-worldly life.

     
  • We dedicate so much of our lives trying to fit in and feel like we belong. With each passing year we realize the brokenness of our world and its inability to satisfy the longings of our heart. More and more feeling out of place might actually be a good thing? God's Son unsurprisingly seemed out of place when he came to this earth. Therefore, it shouldn't surprise us when the same is true of those who follow him. All the more we want to discover the beauty of knowing we don’t belong.

  • The apostle Paul calls the message he preached “foolish” (1 Corinthians 1 & 2). What he means is that human reason is offended and baffled by what he and the rest of Jesus’ ambassadors proclaimed. That is certainly the case with the most fundamental teaching of Scripture—the doctrine of God. The Bible teaches that the one true God exists as the Father and the Son and the Holy Spirit. Each of these three Persons has a different consciousness. Each has a different personality. Each is distinct from the other. It is not as though one Person were acting in three different ways or fulfilling three different roles, however. There are three Persons. Each is fully God, doing divine things and having divine attributes. At the same time the Bible also says there is only one God. Not three gods, but one God. Logically the doctrine of the Trinity is beyond our ability to understand. The only way we could ever believe such a thing is by the working of the Holy Spirit through God’s Word. On this Festival of the Holy Trinity we recognize that we have a triune (three-in-one) God who is so great and so far above us, we cannot fully comprehend him. Yet we also rejoice that this “holy, holy, holy” Lord God is merciful and gracious, blessing us with hope and peace that will endure forever. Praise God! Praise Father, Son, and Holy Spirit!

  • “Life is a journey.” You’ve heard that axiom more often than you can count. Some will point out that “life has its ups and downs." Others will warn that life is full of "detours" and "forks in the road." So much is said about our “personal journey” that we can lose sight of the One who alone makes life purposeful and meaningful. Far more significant than the journey we take, Jesus' road took him on the path of suffering, death, and hell. Yet the path he paved and the life he gave lead us to the peace and security we could never have reached on our own.